The Resistance of the Just Soul

Clinton, South Carolina, Monday, January 15, 2018, 12:15 p.m.

Fritz Kolbe is just a man. He has no yearning to kill and never does so in Andreas Kollender’s The Honest Spy, expertly translated into English by Steve Anderson.

Perhaps because the novel begins in South Africa, where he is assigned a diplomatic post by the German government, Kolbe never adapts to the hate epitomized in the Nazi regime back home. After being called back to Berlin, Kolbe is appalled at the fanatical devotion to Adolf Hitler in those with whom he works. He leaves his beloved daughter, Katrin, in South Africa to protect her, and she spends the story in what the songwriter John Hartford called “the backroads and the rivers of [his] memory, ever smiling, ever gentle on [his] mind.”

By Monte Dutton

Kolbe clings to elusive humanity, and it alone transforms him into a spy in a world where everyone is suspicious. He sacrifices everything except his decency.

He is a flawed hero who falls madly in love with a soldier’s wife. He inadvertently provides information to the Americans that results in the death of his best friend and the suicide of his best friend’s wife. He loses his love and never enjoys a reunion with his daughter. He doesn’t ultimately get enough credit for what he does.

The story switches back and forth between the events of the war and a telling of his story to two journalists.

As the pages wind down, one has a sinking feeling, knowing that the protagonist will survive, but that he will lose the love of his mistress, Marlene, but not knowing how. The ending falls like cruel dominoes. I was up late last night, unable to set it aside without experiencing the fulfillment of the inevitable melancholy.

Kolbe survives by competence and guile. He makes mistakes but somehow manages to survive. His soul? Not so much. He refuses to accept compensation for his righteousness. Profit would undermine the nobility of his motives.

Based on a true story, Kollender fictionalizes what he must and spins a tale every bit as plausible as the real story likely was. The author manages to find a modest humanity in characters who would seem to have none. He depicts a nation driven to madness with as much understanding as is “humanly” possible.

Please consider making a pledge to support my writing here.

Most of my own books are available here.

For more information about The Honest Spy, sample it here.

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Getting High on Jaymo and J.P.

Clinton, South Carolina, Sunday, December 24, 2017, 11:17 a.m.

I’ve never been anywhere near the same distant universe as J.P. Dooley’s Getting High: The Jaymo Chronicles I, and I haven’t really read another novel like it.

Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Maybe, though it wasn’t a novel.

I’ve written about the dangerous release of post-war depravity in Cowboys Come Home, a novel set at the end of World War II, but that war had little to do with Vietnam, and the two Marines, Ennis Middlebrooks and Harry Byerly had even less to do with Jaymo and Tooker. Becky Middlebrooks, whose wild rebelliousness originated back home in Texas, is slightly closer, but it was a different time. Becky was reacting to the release of homeland sacrifice. World War II was ultimately triumphant; Vietnam was ultimately futile and needless.

By Monte Dutton

How could the world have changed so much? Oh, maybe because Jimmy Mahoney, a.k.a. Jaymo, is a denizen of almost five decades ago. He and his contemporaries live by Hippie Law, which is rather simple: “Whatever you have to do to get high.” It’s more absolute than Libertarianism ever thought about being.

I don’t remember why I bought it in June. It could have been for research. That’s why I read Wolfe’s tale of the Merry Pranksters, but I was already a fan of Wolfe’s revolutionary non-fiction. Some influence came from the writing of fellow Clinton native Joey Holland. Getting High almost got lost in my Kindle. I sampled the detective classics of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett for much of the summer and fall while writing about a stock car racer I invented named Barrie Jarman and trying to rewrite the ending of a manuscript that will soon be out as Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.

When I finally embarked upon Getting High – not a double entendre – it seemed entirely possible that I would only sample it and set it aside.

But it is well-written. No. It is exquisitely written.

The author is a self-professed graduate of Vietnam and psychedelics, and whatever their deleterious effects, they did not leave his writing skills impaired. Jaymo follows a terrain common to the roads traveled by Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, and Jack Nicholson in Easy Rider, a classic movie. The interstates have replaced those roads. Dooley’s prose has not.

(Monte Dutton photos)

Kindle is a useful reading vehicle because Dooley’s skilled words are sprinkled with words I do not know, and Kindle allows the reader to look them up instantly where once I kept a dictionary at hand for such knowledge. Some of his words occur in no dictionaries, at least not the ones downloaded into Kindles, but he writes so well that the reader is able to figure them out.

It’s left me contemplative. Yesterday I was as irreverent on Twitter as if I’d been stoned. I was, but on non-stop football. For the last few days, I read it as if I were on one of Jaymo’s benders, jangled in the flow of Dooley’s elegant, if often fragmented, sentences.

The audio version of Cowboys Come Home is available on Audible, iTunes and, by clicking here, Amazon.

The Barrie Jarman Adventures (Gabe Whisnant photo)

Forgive Us Our Trespasses, my wild tale of Southern crime and political corruption, is available on an Amazon Kindle sale for $0.99 all week. Download it here.

The books of mine that are not on sale are still quite inexpensive. Shop their impressive variety here.

Signed copies of three of my seven novels — Cowboys Come Home, Lightning in a Bottle, and Life Gets Complicated — are available in uptown Clinton at L&L Office Supply and Ella Jane’s, and in Spartanburg at Hub City Bookshop.

Turning Phrases with a Deft Touch

Raymond Chandler

Clinton, South Carolina, Monday, November 27, 2017, 6:32 p.m.

By Monte Dutton

Raymond Chandler was an extraordinary novelist and screenwriter. I can only imagine how great a sports columnist he would have been.

This man could turn a phrase. They cascade through his prose like waterfalls.

“… she had a blue mink that almost made the Rolls-Royce look like just another automobile. It didn’t quite. Nothing can.”

“Alcohol is like love. The first kiss is magic, the second is intimate, the third is routine. After that you take the girl’s clothes off.”

“In jail a man has no personality. He is a minor disposal problem and a few entries on reports.”

“Cops are like a doctor that gives you aspirin for a brain tumor, except the cop would rather cure it with a blackjack.”

He was the type of writer who made a reader want to take notes. His pulp fiction was of a high order. He removed the pulp. For years I watched movies of his books and took notes in the recesses of my mind that I wanted to read them. The Big Sleep. The Long Goodbye. I read the former earlier this year. The latter I just finished.

The Big Sleep was the better movie, though it took the novel for me to realize what entirely was going on. The Long Goodbye is the better novel. It took me a long time to read it because I felt the need to absorb it. It’s not hard to read. One tends to go back and retrace a sentence or paragraph just to experience the full effect of the observations made.

Life Gets Complicated, Lightning in a Bottle and Cowboys Come Home are available at Emma Jane’s and L&L Office Supply in uptown Clinton.

Another reason, unfortunately in my case, was that the Kindle edition I purchased was shoddily produced. Whoever provided it must have just run some kind of scanner and never glanced back at what was scanned. If I had a lot more time than I do, I’d have counted all the times “dear” showed up as “clear,” but I never could have kept up with the vice-versas. Pages break after four lines. It’s damned annoying.

The plot is complicated enough without having to be a private investigator, a Philip Marlowe, of the text.

None of this was Chandler’s fault. He died in 1959. He might have kindled romance, but he never owned one.

 

(Gabe Whisnant photo)

Most of my books — non-fiction on NASCAR and music, collections that include my contributions, seven novels, and one short-story collection — are available here.

Cowboys Cheap as French Fries

(Monte Dutton photo)

Clinton, South Carolina, Tuesday, August 1, 2017, 12:36 p.m.

Hey, there. Hi, there. Ho, there. I wrote a western last fall. It’s not just any western. It’s a modern western, set at the end of World War II, when a couple Marines return home to Texas, looking for peace, love, and understanding even though they’d be willing to settle for two out of three.

By Monte Dutton

As it turned out, Ennis Middlebrooks and Harry Byerly really just got understanding. When they got back to Janus, things were only marginally less wild than they had been on the island of Peleliu. They didn’t expect war to prepare them for home. They expected war to prepare them for peace.

Cowboys Come Home’s writing had about as many twists as its plot. It goes way back, or at least as far back as me writing fiction, which began, in terms of publication, in 2011, when my first novel, The Audacity of Dope, reached shelves real and virtual courtesy of Neverland Publishing LLC. At about the time the second novel, The Intangibles, was also published by Neverland, in 2013, a publisher interested in westerns contacted me, through a third party, about writing one.

Cowboys Come Home

Kindle Sale, August 2-4

$0.99 Wednesday, August 2, 8 a.m. EDT — Thursday, August 3, 5 a.m.

$1.99 Thursday, August 3, 5 a.m. — Friday, August 4, 2 a.m.

$2.99 Friday, August 4, 2 a.m.-11 p.m.

(Steven Novak cover)

My first response was that writing novels is much too difficult if one isn’t in love with the story. By sheer coincidence, I took a long driving trip, and while I was driving through the Smoky Mountains, I dreamed up a modern western about two cowboys coming home from war. I’m fond of modern westerns, both in print and on the silver screen. I started thinking about Larry McMurtry’s Leaving Cheyenne and The Last Picture Show, and Clark Gable’s final movie, The Misfits, and Giant, the movie made from an Edna Ferber novel of the same name.

When I got back home, I started writing, and I sent a sample to the publisher, and the publisher … wrote back that it wasn’t what he had in mind.

I suspect it didn’t enough campfires, sagebrush, tumbleweeds, branding arms, spurs and chaps, saloons, cattle drives, and gunfights at high noon.

I left it there.

Amazon’s KindleScout program picked up Crazy of Natural Causes, the tale of a Kentucky football coach who loses everything, finds Jesus, wobbles between sin and salvation, and inexplicably finds a comfortable space there. KindleScout also chose Forgive Us Our Trespasses, a wild, outlandish, bloody tale of the political family from hell, conveniently situated right here in the Palmetto State.

(Monte Dutton sketch)

Then I went back to Cowboys Come Home, which was not chosen by KindleScout, so I self-published it through CreateSpace (for print) and Kindle Direct Publishing. It has law and disorder, cattle and oil, political corruption, horses and cars, a wild baby sister, and a killer on the loose. The skills Ennis and Harry hoped never to need again are what save them when they return home to Janus, a town just south of the border between Texas and Oklahoma.

It sold all right. Folks who read it liked it. I stole its thunder, though, this spring by releasing Lightning in a Bottle, my stock car racing novel.

Cowboys Come Home is not a classic western. It is brutal, profane, lustful, and violent.

In order to jumpstart recent sales that are almost nonexistent, I have concocted a brief, three-day blowout of the Kindle version. The full retail is only $3.99, but over the next few days, it will be offered first at $0.99, then $1.99, then $2.99, before returning to $3.99 by the weekend. The sale begins at 8 a.m. EDT on Wednesday morning.

Grab a western. Don’t cost much.

 

(Steven Novak design)

If you’d like me to mail you a signed copy of Lightning in a Bottle, or any of my other novels, you can find my address and instructions at montedutton.com. (montedutton.com/blog/merchandise)

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)
(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

I’ve written six novels and a collection of short stories. I’ve also written a number of books about sports, mostly about NASCAR. You can find most of them here.

The Kindle versions of my books, where available, can be found above. Links below are to print editions.

LightningBottle_CVR_LRG
(Cover design by Steven Novak)

Lightning in a Bottle is the story of Barrie Jarman, the hope of stock car racing’s future. Barrie, a 18-year-old from Spartanburg, South Carolina, is both typical of his generation and a throwback to the sport’s glory days.

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

Cowboys Come Home is a modern western. Two World War II heroes come home from the Pacific to Texas.

I’ve written a crime novel about the corrosive effects of patronage and the rise and fall of a powerful politician and his dysfunctional family, Forgive Us Our Trespasses.

I’ve written about what happens to a football coach when he loses everything, Crazy of Natural Causes. It’s a fable of life’s absurdity.

(Melanie Ryon cover design)
(Melanie Ryon cover design)

I’ve written a tale of the Sixties in the South, centered on school integration and a high school football team, The Intangibles.

(Joe Font cover design)
(Joe Font cover design)

I’ve written a rollicking yarn about the feds trying to track down and manipulate a national hero who just happens to be a pot-smoking songwriter, The Audacity of Dope.

I’ve written a collection of 11 short stories, all derived from songs I wrote, Longer Songs.

Signed copies of Lightning in a Bottle are on sale at Emma Jane’s (see ad above). Signed copies of all my fiction are also on sale at L&L Office Supply in uptown Clinton, South Carolina.

(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)
(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)

Follow me on Twitter @montedutton, @hmdutton (about writing), and/or @wastedpilgrim (more opinionated and irreverent). I’m on Facebook (Monte.Dutton), Instagram (TUG50), and Google-Plus (MonteDuttonWriter).

Paradise? Yeah, Right …

(Monte Dutton photo)

Clinton, South Carolina, Thursday, July 6, 2017, 11:15 a.m.

It is no discredit to The Last Paradise that it took me too long to read it. It was circumstance. I’ve been buried in my own writing, and there’s no end in sight. I’ve gotten myself overloaded with writing, and my reading has suffered, which is ultimately counterproductive because, in order for one to write, one must read.

By Monte Dutton

I must anyway. Lack of reading makes me a dull boy. Jack, however, is not a dull boy. Jack Beilis is the resourceful protagonist of Antonio Garrido’s tale (translated into English by Simon Bruni).

Perhaps I am overly inquisitive. The realization that thousands of Americans migrated to the Soviet Union, seeking opportunity and fairness, in the depths of the Great Depression, fascinated me. I’m fond of history. Two of my novels, The Intangibles (set mostly in 1968) and Cowboys Come Home (mostly 1946), explore historical themes.

Garrido wrote a deft whodunit. Jack is exceptional at thinking on his feet but lacking in thinking things through. He trusts too many people, particularly when he reaches an unfamiliar land where almost no one is trustworthy. Jack is a skilled tactician but a naïve strategist.

The Soviet Union of the early 1930s has grown corrupt in its empty reliance on ideology. Philosophy becomes mythology. The leadership grows ruthless as the starving proletariat grows desperate and restless. Americans become the scapegoats. They have stumbled waywardly into a trap.

Jack and those he attempts to help wait too late. The only innocent becomes the tragic hero.

The author tricked me as an author must in a crackling whodunit. I thought he was tipping off his pitches. I was wrong. When I read such fiction, I want to be wrong.

 

 

 

(Steven Novak design)

If you’d like me to mail you a signed copy of Lightning in a Bottle, or any of my other novels, you can find my address and instructions at montedutton.com. (montedutton.com/blog/merchandise)

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)
(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

I’ve written six novels and a collection of short stories. I’ve also written a number of books about sports, mostly about NASCAR. You can find most of them here.

The Kindle versions of my books, where available, can be found above. Links below are to print editions.

LightningBottle_CVR_LRG
(Cover design by Steven Novak)

Lightning in a Bottle is the story of Barrie Jarman, the hope of stock car racing’s future. Barrie, a 18-year-old from Spartanburg, South Carolina, is both typical of his generation and a throwback to the sport’s glory days.

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

Cowboys Come Home is a modern western. Two World War II heroes come home from the Pacific to Texas.

I’ve written a crime novel about the corrosive effects of patronage and the rise and fall of a powerful politician and his dysfunctional family, Forgive Us Our Trespasses.

I’ve written about what happens to a football coach when he loses everything, Crazy of Natural Causes. It’s a fable of life’s absurdity.

(Melanie Ryon cover design)
(Melanie Ryon cover design)

I’ve written a tale of the Sixties in the South, centered on school integration and a high school football team, The Intangibles.

(Joe Font cover design)
(Joe Font cover design)

I’ve written a rollicking yarn about the feds trying to track down and manipulate a national hero who just happens to be a pot-smoking songwriter, The Audacity of Dope.

I’ve written a collection of 11 short stories, all derived from songs I wrote, Longer Songs.

Signed copies of Lightning in a Bottle are on sale at Emma Jane’s (see ad above). Signed copies of all my fiction are also on sale at L&L Office Supply in uptown Clinton, South Carolina.

(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)
(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)

Follow me on Twitter @montedutton, @hmdutton (about writing), and/or @wastedpilgrim (more opinionated and irreverent). I’m on Facebook (Monte.Dutton), Instagram (TUG50), and Google-Plus (MonteDuttonWriter).

The Mystery Immerses

Clinton, South Carolina, Friday, May 12, 2017, 9:43 a.m.

Many readers – okay, at least one – have comfortable refuges and guilty pleasures. Read something heavy – a bulky bio, a literary classic, an historical tome – and then scurry back to relaxing, reliable delight. It might be a comedy – a Carl Hiaasen or a Dan Jenkins – or hard-bitten crime – Elmore Leonard, Raymond Chandler – or one of John Steinbeck’s short novels of whimsy, or a Larry McMurtry western …

By Monte Dutton

… Or a mystery. A Dick Francis mystery. Francis died a few years back. Fortunately, he was so prolific that I’m nowhere near reading all his reliable tales of horse-racing intrigue.

(I’m running out of Leonard. That’s a problem.)

In Farleigh Field, by Rhys Bowen, fills my void. It quenches the thirst left in the aftermath of Francis’s illustrious career, and it echoes a favorite television show of mine, Foyle’s War. Mystery, coupled with World War II intrigue. What a smooth combination.

It all starts with a thud. On the estate of Lord Westerham and his five daughters, a parachute fails to open. Though the body found on the estate, Farleigh Place, is clothed in a British Army uniform, the remains are those of an impostor. From the field where the body lies does the plot spread and thicken.

Ben Cresswell, confined to desk duty after surviving a plane crash, is sent by M15 to investigate why an apparent German spy has crashed into Farleigh Field. It all gets mixed up in love, family, loyalty, and, well, geography.

The reader winds up playing chess with the author, and it’s a lovely match. Disloyal members of the English aristocracy, the Gestapo, the French Resistance, and all five of Lord Westerham’s daughters take part with gusto. A dashing hero arrives home from a prisoner’s camp. Personal loyalties wither against the tide of war.

It’s a rousing yarn Ms. Bowen has woven into form.

(Steven Novak design)

If you’d like me to mail you a signed copy of Lightning in a Bottle, or any of my other novels, you can find my address and instructions at montedutton.com. (montedutton.com/blog/merchandise)

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)
(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

I’ve written six novels and a collection of short stories. I’ve also written a number of books about sports, mostly about NASCAR. You can find most of them here.

The Kindle versions of my books, where available, can be found above. Links below are to print editions.

LightningBottle_CVR_LRG
(Cover design by Steven Novak)

Lightning in a Bottle is the story of Barrie Jarman, the hope of stock car racing’s future. Barrie, a 18-year-old from Spartanburg, South Carolina, is both typical of his generation and a throwback to the sport’s glory days.

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

Cowboys Come Home is a modern western. Two World War II heroes come home from the Pacific to Texas.

I’ve written a crime novel about the corrosive effects of patronage and the rise and fall of a powerful politician and his dysfunctional family, Forgive Us Our Trespasses.

I’ve written about what happens to a football coach when he loses everything, Crazy of Natural Causes. It’s a fable of life’s absurdity.

(Melanie Ryon cover design)
(Melanie Ryon cover design)

I’ve written a tale of the Sixties in the South, centered on school integration and a high school football team, The Intangibles.

(Joe Font cover design)
(Joe Font cover design)

I’ve written a rollicking yarn about the feds trying to track down and manipulate a national hero who just happens to be a pot-smoking songwriter, The Audacity of Dope.

I’ve written a collection of 11 short stories, all derived from songs I wrote, Longer Songs.

Signed copies of Lightning in a Bottle are on sale at Emma Jane’s (see ad above). Signed copies of all my fiction are also on sale at L&L Office Supply in uptown Clinton, South Carolina.

(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)
(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)

Follow me on Twitter @montedutton, @hmdutton (about writing), and/or @wastedpilgrim (more opinionated and irreverent). I’m on Facebook (Monte.Dutton), Instagram (TUG50), and Google-Plus (MonteDuttonWriter).

 

 

As The Salesman Says, You Can’t Afford Not To …

Clinton, South Carolina, Friday, April 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.

I spend a lot of time writing, and I spend another considerable chunk writing about how you need to read … my writing.

Tell my whyyyyyy, whyyyy, why, why, why! Whyyyyyy, why should you read my boooooks?

By Monte Dutton

Among the reasons is I have expenses. I have bills to pay. This is how I make my living. Sort of.

I always use the analogy of the baseball scorebook. You know that one, right? There is only way to score a baseball game. That’s the way that works for you. Many more options are available than skinning a cat, though I’ve never done it, so I can’t say. There is allegedly one way. Google it, and I’m satisfied there’s more than one.

Wait a minute. The actual saying is, “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” Never mind. Thank goodness for Google.

Lightning in a Bottle is lightning in a wraparound cover. It’s in paperback (and Kindle, of course), so it has no book jacket. It’s built in. It’s still lightning, though.

The lightning is Barrie Jarman. He left home to make his fortune in stock car racing. He also chases women, drinks moonshine, and plays guitar. His daddy is an alcoholic. His uncle has been working on race cars for thirty years. He’s another reason Barrie leaves home. He gives him a cabin to live in. He spreads the word that his nephew wields a magic wand disguised as a steering wheel.

From the start, after Barrie signs a contract with Ford Racing and lands a ride in FASCAR’s Enervation Series, he and the ruling body are at odds. He speaks his mind and believes it’s necessary to do so in order to bring kids like him back to the sport, if not in the cockpits, then in the grandstands. FASCAR doesn’t want him to do anything his own way. The whippersnapper is supremely confident that he knows what he’s doing.

(Cover design by Steven Novak)

Barrie’s got to be good. He won’t last long, popping off at the mouth, if he isn’t. Winning races isn’t the problem. He starts doing that right off.

He’s lucky, though. He’s a brash kid and a throwback at the same time. His owner, Jerry McCarley, is a throwback, too. His manager, Frank Maglie, knows every FASCAR act of duplicity like the back of his hand. He knows how they think. He keeps Barrie aware of it.

Barrie is at his best when his back is to the wall. He thrives on controversy. His greatest knack is being lucky in the aftermath of being unlucky. Like all great racers, he’s most impressive when there are obstacles in his path.

If you’re a race fan, this novel is going to wow you. You’ve never read anything like it. It’s as fast as the cars.

If you’re not a race fan, it’s going to interest you because its lessons can be applied to many other pastimes. It’s about racing and race, love and deception, the temptations of youth and money, and learning how to adapt from being on the wrong side of the tracks to the wrong side of the (racing) law.

You’re going to love it. Some of it may offend you, but some of it is definitely going to make you laugh.

(Steven Novak design)

If you’d like me to mail you a signed copy of Lightning in a Bottle, or any of my other novels, you can find my address and instructions at montedutton.com. (montedutton.com/blog/merchandise)

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)
(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

I’ve written six novels and a collection of short stories. I’ve also written a number of books about sports, mostly about NASCAR. You can find most of them here.

The Kindle versions of my books, where available, can be found above. Links below are to print editions.

Lightning in a Bottle is the story of Barrie Jarman, the hope of stock car racing’s future. Barrie, a 18-year-old from Spartanburg, South Carolina, is both typical of his generation and a throwback to the sport’s glory days.

(Jennifer Skutelsky cover design)

Cowboys Come Home is a modern western. Two World War II heroes come home from the Pacific to Texas.

I’ve written a crime novel about the corrosive effects of patronage and the rise and fall of a powerful politician and his dysfunctional family, Forgive Us Our Trespasses.

I’ve written about what happens to a football coach when he loses everything, Crazy of Natural Causes. It’s a fable of life’s absurdity.

(Melanie Ryon cover design)
(Melanie Ryon cover design)

I’ve written a tale of the Sixties in the South, centered on school integration and a high school football team, The Intangibles.

(Joe Font cover design)
(Joe Font cover design)

I’ve written a rollicking yarn about the feds trying to track down and manipulate a national hero who just happens to be a pot-smoking songwriter, The Audacity of Dope.

I’ve written a collection of 11 short stories, all derived from songs I wrote, Longer Songs.

Signed copies of Lightning in a Bottle are on sale at Emma Jane’s (see ad above). Signed copies of all my fiction are also on sale at L&L Office Supply in uptown Clinton, South Carolina.

(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)
(Cover photo by Crystal Lynn)

Follow me on Twitter @montedutton, @hmdutton (about writing), and/or @wastedpilgrim (more opinionated and irreverent). I’m on Facebook (Monte.Dutton), Instagram (TUG50), and Google-Plus (MonteDuttonWriter).